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Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.


He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
 

, — Dəşti">
Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.

He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
 

, — Dəşti
(77) 3:27


  • He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    — Gül açdı">
  • Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.


    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Gül açdı">
    Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.

    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Gül açdı
    (49) 2:56


  • He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    — Qarğamışam">
  • Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.


    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Qarğamışam">
    Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.

    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Qarğamışam
    (43) 3:09


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — Əlində sazın qurbanı">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Əlində sazın qurbanı">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Əlində sazın qurbanı
    (73) 2:35


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — Gül bağçalar">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Gül bağçalar">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Gül bağçalar
    (63) 3:30


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — Qaçaq Nəbi">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Qaçaq Nəbi">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Qaçaq Nəbi
    (58) 3:23


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — Qara tellər">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Qara tellər">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Qara tellər
    (50) 4:07

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  • Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.


    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Bayatı-Qacar">
    Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.

    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Bayatı-Qacar
    (124) 3:03

  • Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.

    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    — Arazbarı">

    Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.


    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Arazbarı">
    Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.

    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Arazbarı
    (43) 3:03

  • Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.

    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    — Xumar oldum">

    Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.


    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Xumar oldum">
    Jabbar Garyagdioglu or Garyaghdyoglu (March 31, 1861, Shusha – 20 April 1944, Baku) was an Azerbaijani folk singer (khananda). He is known as the first khananda to perform mughamats in the Azeri language.

    He was born in the Seyidlar neighbourhood of Shusha to a family of a dyer. His stage name Garyagdioglu literally translates from Azeri as Son of Snow-Has-Fallen. According to an urban legend, Jabbar's father Meshadi Ismayil was an extremely reserved and taciturn man and as a result, would often be asked in an idiomatic way, common to Azeri: "Why are you so gloomy? Has the snow fallen?" Therefore he was nicknamed Garyagdi (Anglicisation of qar yağdı - "snow has fallen"). 

    Despite his father's plans, Jabbar did not take up his business and decided to become a singer. His older brother, an amateur folk singer, played an important role in young Jabbar's passion for music. In 1871–1876 Garyagdioglu attended school where he took vocal lessons, studied the theory of music and the Persian language. While still in his teens, he was accepted into the ensemble of the notable musician Sadigjan. Until age 20, he performed primarily in his native Karabakh, but soon he became famous in other parts of the South Caucasus, and later would make tours to Iran and Central Asia.

    In 1901, Garyagdioglu moved to the oil-booming Baku that at the time was rapidly becoming an important social and cultural city of the region. Together with Uzeyir Hajibeyov and other prominent musicians he founded a club in the Baku suburb of Balakhany and would give charity concerts to support the poor. Between 1906 and 1912 he visited Kiev, Moscow and Warsaw together with other Azeri khanandas, where a vinyl recording of his performance was made. 

    On his way back from Warsaw, he and his ensemble gave a successful two-day Oriental concert in Moscow. Garyagdioglu mostly sang in Azeri and Persian, however some mughamats were performed in Georgian, Armenian, Uzbek, and Turkmen.[3] For 20 years, he was accompanied by sazandas Gurban Pirimov (tar) and Sasha Ohanezashvili (kamancheh).

    In 1916, he appeared in the Azeri film Neft va milyonlar saltanatinda ("In the Realm of Oil and Millions"). After Sovietization, he taught classical music at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire and was the soloist of the Azerbaijan State Philharmonic Society. During his long musical career, he collected and recorded around 500 folk songs and tunes, which became part of the conservatoire's record library. 
     

    , — Xumar oldum
    (53) 3:04


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — A dağlar">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — A dağlar">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — A dağlar
    (101) 2:31


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — Gözlərinə aşiqəm.mp3">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Gözlərinə aşiqəm.mp3">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Gözlərinə aşiqəm.mp3
    (71) 4:14


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — Niyə belə baxırsan">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Niyə belə baxırsan">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Niyə belə baxırsan
    (51) 3:29


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — Qara tellər (2)">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Qara tellər (2)">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Qara tellər (2)
    (36) 3:42


  • She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    — Sona keçdi">


    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Sona keçdi">Hagigat Rzayeva (May 20, 1907, Lankaran – August 2, 1969, Baku) was an Azerbaijani actress, teacher and singer (folk, opera, and pop).

    Hagigat Rzayeva was recognized as the People's Artist of Azerbaijan in 1943. She was one of the first female singers who performed on the Azerbaijani stage.

    From 1928 to 1932 Rzayeva was singing mugam in Azerbaijan State Conservatory. She took music lessons from Jabbar Garyaghdioghlu, Seyid Shushinski and Gurban Pirimov. Rzayeva was the soloist of Azerbaijani Opera and Ballet Theatre. She became famous as a singer of mugam and folk music. For fifteen years she performed with opera singer Huseyngulu Sarabski.     

    She continued acting in the Opera Theatre until her retirement in 1952. In 1930 and 1934 she also appeared in three films.

    Her most famous roles are those of Arabzangi (Shah Ismayil by Muslum Magomayev), as well as Leyli, Asli, Telli ("Leyli and Majnun”, "Asli and Karam”, "The Cloth Peddler” by Uzeyir Hajibeyov) and Sanam (O olmasin, bu olsun by Uzeyir Hajibeyov).

    She married Huseyn Rzayev, the stage manager of the Opera Theatre, and had three children. Their two sons pursued career in professional music while their daughter became a literature instructor at the Azerbaijan State Conservatoire. 
    , — Sona keçdi
    (53) 7:41

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    President Aliyev unveils Garayev monument

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    Azerbaijani President Ilham Aliyev and First Lady Mehriban Aliyeva took part in an event held in Baku to unveil a monument to the great Azerbajiani composer Gara Garayev, azernews....

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